Setting Up As A Mobile DJ

So, you want to be a turntable-toting, speaker-hauling mobile DJ? Awesome! Sounds simple, right? Well, it might not be as simple as you would think. There are many different things you should genuinely consider when you commit yourself to realising your dream of being a mobile DJ.

Choosing the Right Set For You

Selecting your own DJ equipment supplies is the most important decision that you will make when you are a beginner DJ: it’s imperative that you do research on different brands, different complete setups and the importance of different hardware and software. Therefore, don’t just go out and buy every single piece of kit that you see: there are so many kits and controllers that are affordable and present you with everything that you will need to start up your career.

Buy yourself the best personal beginner setup and you’ll be great; buy yourself the wrong one and learning to DJ will be a trial. Many people rush into this without doing their research, whereupon they dash to the nearest store and buy a kit that a professional would use: this is too difficult for them then, and they give up on becoming that amazing, skilled DJ.

What Equipment You Should Begin With

Although many people have their own personal preferences as to what hardware they mobile DJ with, there are certain things that are necessary to get yourself off the ground. Obviously, you’ll need to provide all of your equipment yourself.

First, you should decide exactly what kind of music you’re going to want to play: physical, or digital? Physical mediums include cassette tapes and vinyls and a turntable to play them on, whereas digital mediums refer to storing the music and DJ’ing from a laptop or computer and using DJ software. Each of these mediums carry their own advantages and disadvantages.

Physical mediums, such as vinyl and CD, are very popular among DJs: to actually feel the rhythm pulsing beneath your fingertips. Not only does it feel authentic, but it certainly looks really cool. Many DJs argue that while digital DJ’ing may seem great, it comes at a cost to the quality of music produced, although this is debated. Others argue that it allows for a higher level of creativity and that, although perhaps a more demanding way of producing and mixing music, it is a far more rewarding experience and awards a higher degree of personality to their music.

Digital mediums, including DJ software and the use of laptops, are becoming increasingly popular amongst the DJ’ing community. Many older DJs switched from the use of physical to digital mediums due to the greater reliability of digital music, the better organisation of music libraries, and the ease of which they can actually transport their setups. Nowadays, DJ software is firmly unified with distinct hardware.